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Planet Ohio

Personal Goals for Ubuntu 15.04

The Ubuntu Sense - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 16:13

I thought I written post for 14.10 but I didn’t…I think real life was too stressful on me at that time, but I wrote one for 14.04.

Between the 14.04 cycle and the 14.10 cycle, I completed one of the six (6) or so goals and I’m working on one them, which   I understand why I was not able to complete the other four (4) (or so) goals and I will explain why:

Ubuntu Doc Team

I learned that the main focus of the the Doc team should be the desktop/server docs not the wiki.  But still, there should be a some group of people that should be the admins of the wiki.  What is really required is recruiting experts on the subject matter to update the wiki pages along with the wiki admins to rename and delete pages.

Ubuntu Ohio Team

I learned that most of the LoCo’s are dead and Ubuntu Ohio is one of them.  Or I am not putting in enough energy in recruiting people into the LoCo.  Or not networking enough.

Ubuntu Women

I learned that we don’t have resources to run an outreach program.  But I learned that there is other ways to do “outreach”.

Between the time that I started to get involved and now, I joined three teams and was elected as an Elected Leader and as a Memebership Board member.  I created new goals as I failed many of them to many factors.  These are:

Ubuntu Doc Team

Nothing for now.

Ubuntu Oho Team

Nothing for now.

Ubuntu Women

I have three (3) goals, two of which are sub-goals of the main goal: help get more women involved with Ubuntu and FOSS.  The other one is related to the main goal of help get more women involved but it’s a collaboration between another team.

The first two goals are finish the Orientation Quiz and publish it, and get Harvest developed enough for anyone to use.  The other goal is to start a collaboration Ubuntu Scientists since that was one thing that was brought up while working on the Orientation Quiz.

Ubuntu Scientists

The collaboration project mainly and perhaps one of the other goals of the team. And also try to get the team active.

Ubuntu Leadership

Most likely, the goal is to collect information on issues that leaders face and write those articles.  And also try to get the team active.

 

 


Categories: Planet Ohio

Don’t Feed the Giant Octopus!

The Ubuntu Sense - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 16:03

This Giant Octopus that I’m talking about is GOOGLE.  Google has it’s giant arms everywhere in the tech world and it’s mind is only on one thing: PRIVACY INVASION.

Today, I read a post by Oli Warner about Paypal’s app on the android and the permissions that it requires the user to accept when installing or updating (see image on right, credit Oil).  Google is the only one that tells the developers that you must allow these permissions when the app is installed.  This allows developers to easily take your data, or even a hacker, and use that data and do whatever they want with it.  That is a huge risk that people are taking when they don’t read the permissions when they install/update.

I ask to protect from Google’s evil and use CyanogenMod with it’s Privacy Guard or some other app that protects you.  Or even better, install F-droid and go Google free. Also, please use Firefox, not Chrome.

There are other evils that Google has but that will be another post for another day.

P.S Read THIS also.

P.S.S.: I want to thank Oli for posting his post.  It’s one thing that I was ranted on but never really wrote a post about the issue.


Categories: Planet Ohio

Ubuntu 14.10

The Ubuntu Sense - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 18:33

Today was the release day of Ubuntu 14.10, code-named “Utopic Unicorn” and my only thoughts are going to this gif from the movie, Despicable Me:

Really, I do think it’s fluffy and awesome!  The only  two features that I noticed that I was able to upgrade from 14.04 to 14.10 without any issues on both of my computers.  That is a first for me.  The other one is the updated icons for the folders of the videos and downloads.  Those do look better than the old ones.

The only thing that I don’t like is that the Unity notifications for new messages is too small.  I hope there is a way to tweak that.

P.S. I did go to the Online release party but I didn’t really enjoy my time since there was too much chatter but it was still fun nagging the bot with !isitout. ;)


Categories: Planet Ohio

Start Planning For 14.11 UOS

The Ubuntu Sense - Mon, 10/06/2014 - 15:53

As it was stated some months ago, the next Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS) is in (almost) a month on November 12th to the 14th.  There will be five (5) tracks: app development, cloud development, community, Ubuntu development, and users.  I will be one of the Community track leads.  Since the UOS is (again almost) a month away, we should start planning for sessions.   For the sessions that don’t need a blueprint, you are welcome to use the “propose a session” button on the UOS homepage.  For the ones that require a blueprint, please use this Google Spreadsheet to add your session idea.  Once we know how to name our UOS blueprints, it will be easy to remember what sessions that still need to be proposed.


Categories: Planet Ohio

Thoughts on Having a Meta Open Science Community

The Ubuntu Sense - Tue, 09/30/2014 - 20:30

Over the last week, I started to think about how to improve the collaboration between the Open Science groups and researchers and also between the groups themselves. One of the ideas that I thought about using simple tools that are around in other Open * places (mainly Open Source/Linux distros). These tools are your forums (Discourse and other ones), Planet feeds, and wikis. Using these creates a meta community where members of the community can start there and get themselves involved in one or more groups. Open Science seems to lack this meta community.

Even though I think that meta community is not present, I do think that there is one group that can maintain this meta community and that group is the Open Knowledge Foundation Network (OKFN). They have a working group for Open Science. Therefore, I think, if they take the time and the resources, then it could happen or else some other group can be created for this.

What this meta community tool-wise needs:

Planet Feeds

Since I’m an official Ubuntu Member, I’m allowed to add my blog’s feed to Planet Ubuntu.  Planet Ubuntu allows anyone to read blog posts from many Ubuntu Members because it’s one giant feed reader.  This is well needed for Open Science, as Reddit doesn’t work for academia.  I asked on the Open Science OKFN mailing list and five people e-mailed me saying that they are interested in seeing one.  My next goal is to ask the folks of Open Science OKFN for help on building a Planet for Open Science.

Forums

I can only think of one forum, which is the Mozilla Science Lab one, that I wrote about last a few hours ago.  Having some general forum allows users to talk about various projects to job posting for their groups.  I don’t know if Discourse would be the right platform for the forums.  To me, it’s dynamicness is a bit too much at times.

Wiki

I have no idea if a wiki would work for this meta Open Science community but at least having a guide that introduces newcomers to the groups is worthwhile to have.  There is a plan for a guide.

I hope these ideas can be used by some group within the Open Science community and allow it the grow.


Categories: Planet Ohio

Mozilla Science Lab Forums Now Open

The Ubuntu Sense - Tue, 09/30/2014 - 17:08

I am pleased to announce that the Mozilla Science Lab now has a forum that anyone can use.  Anyone can introduce themselves in this topic or the category.


Categories: Planet Ohio

Open Science: Improving Collaboration Between Researchers

The Ubuntu Sense - Wed, 09/10/2014 - 17:39

The Open Source movement has evolved into other areas of computering.  Open Data, Open Hardware, and ,the topic that I want to talk about, Open Science, are three examples of this.  Since I’m a biologist, I’m deeply connected to the science community but I want to also tie in my hobby of FOSS/Linux into my work.  There are many non-coding (and coding) based things and groups that one can use for research and I want to talk about a few of them.

Mozilla Science Lab

Mozilla, the creators of Firefox and Thunderbird, started a group last year that aims to help scientists, “to use the power of the open web to change the way science is done. [They] build educational resources, tools and prototypes for the research community to make science more open, collaborative and efficient.” (main page of Mozilla Science Lab).

Right now, they are are focusing on teaching scientists the basic skills in research via the Software Carpentry project.  But I know that they are planning to get some projects for the community-building side for non-coders.  I don’t know what those projects are but I know that they will be listed soon on the mailing-list of the group.  For myself, I can’t wait until I get my hands on those projects to help them grow.

Open Science Framework

Another fairly new project within the last two years that was started by Center of Open Science that focuses on creating a framework that allows scientists to use the, “entire research lifecycle: planning, execution, reporting, archiving, and discovery”, (main page of OSF) fully and be able to share that with other people in there teams but thy could be in another place not near the head researcher.

I think this is one of the best tools out there because it allows you to upload things on the site and also from Dropbox and other services.  I played around with it a bit but I have not fully used it, but when I do, I will write a post about it.

Open Notebook Science

This is maybe one of the oldest projects that I think there is for Open Science and it’s Open Notebook Science.  It’s the idea of have the lab notebook publicly available online.  There is a small network of these.

I think, along with the OSF project, it is one of the best tools out there mainly because the data and other stuff is publicly available online for everyone to learn from your mistakes or to work with the data.

Hopefully as the time goes by, these projects will grow and researchers can collaborate better.

 


Categories: Planet Ohio

Non-Developer Based Community Manager?

The Ubuntu Sense - Sun, 09/07/2014 - 07:20

A few days ago, I asked this question on Jono Bacon’s forum and I haven’t gotten an answer yet:

Most of the community manger jobs in the Open Source (and Open *) world require the persons in the position to know how to develop, as in to code rather to develop a new non-coding project, if that made sense. But my thought is there is any Open * communities that are not based on development but on other things. If so, may I have some examples? I’m looking for mainly Open Science ones but any can do.

Thank you.

I would like to have insight here also for the non-members of that forum.  You can post your answer in the comments section in instead of joining the forum and answering there.

Thank you.


Categories: Planet Ohio

An ALL-CALL

Stephen's Blog - Wed, 09/03/2014 - 19:00

The following message was sent as an ALL-CALL to all members of Ubuntu Ohio regardless of their subscription status to the team's Launchpad-based mailing list.

This is an all-call to Ubuntu Ohio.

For the purposes of Ubuntu Global Jam I would like to schedule regional keysignings. Setting up an all-state single gathering is not looking doable at this time. With our not participating in Ohio Linux Fest this year setting things up regionally would seem appropriate.

For those living in any of the following counties I want to set up an event in perhaps Kirtland, Kent, or somewhere in Geagua County: Lorain, Cuyahoga, Medina, Summit, Portage, Trumbull, Geagua, Lake, Ashtabula, Wayne, Stark, and Mahoning. It will be ideal if anybody in the community with proper connections can get us space to meet in on Kent State University's Kent Campus. Relative to Kirtland as a meeting point, I can either contact Kirtland Public Library or talk to Lakeland Community College to get space. As to Geauga County for a meeting point I will be open for suggestions.

No, we will not attempt to go for an inconvenient location such as The Lodge at Geneva State Park in Ashtabula County for the group of counties listed above.

For other portions of the state, I am open to ideas for organization as to where you would like to get together and how wide a net you would like to cast. Please contribute those on the community's mailing list at ubuntu-us-ohio@lists.launchpad.net

If you are interested in participating in this face-to-face event you need to express interest on the mailing list and indicate both what county you live in and your preferred date to get together. We need expressions of interest by NO LATER THAN 10 PM local time on Friday night. Ubuntu Global Jam runs September 12th-14th and Monday will be a day to scramble to get meeting places set up. Instructions on what to bring for the keysigning would be provided by Tuesday night so as to prepare if enough interest is expressed.

For the purposes of this all-call, "enough interest" is going to be defined as a minimum of 3 people other than the person heading up the keysigning session commiting on-list to attend.

If there any questions, please contact the Ohio leadership team by way of this contact form: https://launchpad.net/~ubuntu-us-ohio-council/+contactuser

Thank you for your time and patience.

Stephen Michael Kellat
Leader/Point of Contact, Ubuntu Ohio

Categories: Planet Ohio

Why do I Contribute to Open Source?

The Ubuntu Sense - Mon, 09/01/2014 - 13:35

Note: Before I start this post, in my last post, “Why I Use Open Source”, I made a couple of errors based on what they commented on, mainly on the whole, “who had tabbed Internet browsers first”.  I will do my homework (read: research) and see who is right.

As I said in, Why I Use Open Source” (link above), I have one more example why I use Open Source and also contribute to it.  No, wait!  I have two examples and they will be order based on importance to me.

Example One: Sense of Community

This one is the big one for me, more than the recognition factor.  I don’t know why I feel a very excellent sense of community within the Ubuntu Community.  Maybe it’s the first FOSS/Linux community that I got my head into and was able to get something done.  Why am I saying this?  I found that because of the checks and balances nature of the Open Source and also the volunteer nature, that the members understand what they are creating and giving away will help the greater good.  Also, many of these members are liked-minded and like and like will stick together and care for each other.

Or maybe it’s because throughout the various things that I done with community service (A.K.A. service learning), I have learned that in certain communities, there is a sense of people caring for each other and many of them are like-minded. I think I done about 100 hours of community service where I volunteered at my freshman high school (I went to a school district had freshmen in one building and the 10 -12 graders in another) for a concert band contest to doing 50 hours (I needed 25 hours for a class but ended up doing 50) at a non-profit place that offers free arts and crafts to kids.  Even though I wasn’t helping the kids to create their masterpieces, I was working two and half hours, two times a week, to get the materials ready.  I didn’t mind being the background worker.  But I knew that I gave an impact to the community because I knew that what I was helping to get ready will be given away to kids who want to be creative and want to learn how to create something with there own two hands.

After four years of being an Ubuntu user, I finally gave into the Ubuntu Community and I enjoying so far.  After one year of working in the Community, I really do have great sense on how the Community is no matter the size of it.  I really want to move on into another one, maybe a Open Science one that doesn’t really require anyone to know how to develop/code.

Example Two: Sense of Recognition

If you read books or articles about community, one consistent theme you will find in almost all of them is the importance of recognizing  the contributions that people make. In fact, if you look at a wide variety of successful communities, you would find that one common thing they all offer in exchange for contribution is recognition. It is the fuel that communities run on.  It’s what connects the contributor to their goal, both selfish and selfless. In fact, with open source, the only way a contribution can actually stolen is by now allowing that recognition to happen.  Even the most permissive licenses require attribution, something that tells everybody who made it.

-Michael Hall, from “Why do you contribute to open source?

I do agree with this quote above because there won’t be anyone who wants to contribute if they are not recognized for their work.

At least in the Ubuntu Community (I don’t know about other FOSS communities), the biggest way that one can be recognized for their work is the Ubuntu Membership and it’s perks.  Even though I’m a community building centred person, I still post news about the teams that am I part of or lessons that I have learned.  These posts are useful because they show what I do and how they impact the community.

In my next post I will talk about why I blog since I have talked about here.


Categories: Planet Ohio

Why do I Use Open Source?

The Ubuntu Sense - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 14:03

I decided to respond to Michael Hall’s post, “Why do you contribute to open source?“, but first I will explain why I use open source and in the next post, I will explain why I contribute to it.  I don’t only use it because it’s almost free to use but for the intuitive sense of things that I see in all of the programs that I use.  This intuitive sense matches up with the way that I think and how I do things.

I have three examples why I use Open Source:

Example One: Evernote Ink Notes vs. Xournal- A Shift in My Workflow

This example is a recent thing that happened to me.  On Monday, August, 25, 2014 (first day of my last school year of my undergrad years), I was able to restore my Nexus 7 2013 back to Android from Ubuntu Touch since Ubuntu Touch wasn’t worth while to use (for now) as a working tablet.  For those who want to know, you need at least 2 GB of RAM to use the ./flash-all.sh command.  I only restored my tablet- meaning that I didn’t brother to install a custom ROM on it (don’t ask me why).  After I restored, I installed the Evernote app and signed in to it.  The hour before I restored my tablet, I was in my eight A.M. class and I took hand-written notes on my netbook, Evernote Ink Notes, and my Wacom Intous 4 pen and tablet.  When I opened the notes on my tablet and they looked horrible!  Not because I have chicken scratch for my handwriting (it does get bad at times) but because it was zoomed in and I had to finger scroll.  I had no way to zoom out.  And the UX of the app is just not fun to use.

After that first use of the Evernote, I decided to go back and use my favorite handwritten note-taking program, Xournal, but with some tweaks.  One of them being all of my notes for one class is be one file, when possible, which is for my eight A.M. class.  The other one is be convert the presentation slides for my second and also last class (I have two this term) into PDF and annotate that PDF.

The only problem with this workflow is that Xournal is X based not Qt based.  That means when Mir and Unity 8 comes out, I won’t be able to use my favorite program!  But maybe I could work with some developers and get some of the features of Xournal into the Reminders app.

Example Two: Open Source has More Intuitive Minds

I have noticed that many of the programs that I use have features that are latter used in non-open source programs.  Who had tabs first in Internet browsers?  Firefox.  Conversion from a word/spreadsheet/presentation to PDF?  OpenOffice.  This goes to show that who are more daring to be more intuitive.

When Unity first introduced back in Ubuntu 11.04, it was hard for me to get used to it at first.  I think it took me maybe two months to tell myself to that is the change can be good.  After I installed 11.04, I saw that Unity increased my productivity.  I found that searching in the Dash of Unity was faster than scrolling and clicking through folders on the menu.  Unity is quiet intuitive to my mind and it was here before Windows 8.  Another example of open source having more intuitive minds.

Example three will be in my next post when I will talk about why I contribute to Open Source.  Most likely, I will have a series of posts about why I’m in the FOSS community and other subjects such as why I blog.

 


Categories: Planet Ohio

On my way to DebConf 14

Paul Tagliamonte's Blog - Fri, 08/22/2014 - 10:33

Slowly, but I’ll be in by Tonight, PST (early morning EST!)

Hope to see everyone soon!

Categories: Planet Ohio

The Certificate of Ubuntu Membership

The Ubuntu Sense - Wed, 08/20/2014 - 12:10

Today, in mail, came my Certificate of Ubuntu Membership that I requested back in February.  The photo was taken via my Ubuntu Touch on my Nexus 7 2013.


Categories: Planet Ohio

Ohio Team Wiki Team Wiki Update/Clean Up

The Ubuntu Sense - Tue, 08/19/2014 - 14:23

As my recent project, that is Ubuntu related, and a very overdo task on my To Do list, I worked on updating the Ohio Team Wiki pages (I took some ideas from how the Doc Team Wiki pages look);

  • I removed the unneeded pages after I had approval from Stephen Michael Kellat
  • I lumped similar pages such as the agendas to the meetings and the various events into main pages (/Meetings and /Events) and linked those two main pages on the home page
  • I only have two things left to do which is to fix the banner and find all of the missing records from the mailing list

Hopefully it is cleaner and easier to get the information that one needs.


Categories: Planet Ohio

Restart

Stephen's Blog - Mon, 08/18/2014 - 19:00

Eventually even a blog can be brought back to life. A simple list may be best in order, for now, at the very least:

  • I now have my General-class amateur radio license in the United States
    • I have to find a good way to make use of it
    • The hamexam package in the archive was a great study aid
    • The use of fldigi on high frequency shortwave bands is now possibly in order
  • I am blessed to have a great team of deputies to assist in leading Ubuntu Ohio
  • Podcasting is still offline for the time being due to work-related circumstances
  • The work of the LoCo Council has gotten interesting though due to OpenID issues I cannot write blog posts on that site to talk about things
  • I have been increasingly assisting in backporting software relating to the pump.io network such as dianara and pumpa
Categories: Planet Ohio

PyGotham 2014

Paul Tagliamonte's Blog - Fri, 08/15/2014 - 13:54

I’ll be there this year!

Talks look amazing, I can’t wait to hit up all the talks. Looks really well organized! Talk schedule has a bunch that I want to hit, I hope they’re recorded to watch later!

If anyone’s heading to PyGotham, let me know, I’ll be there both days, likely floating around the talks.

Categories: Planet Ohio

DebConf 14

Paul Tagliamonte's Blog - Sun, 08/10/2014 - 20:06

I’ll be giving a short talk on Debian and Docker!

I’ll prepare some slides to give a brief talk about Debian and Docker, then open it up to have a normal session to talk over what Docker is and isn’t, and how we can use it in Debian better.

Hope to see y’all in Portland!

Categories: Planet Ohio

Ubuntu Leadership Team:Team Leaders Wanted

The Ubuntu Sense - Tue, 07/29/2014 - 10:39

On the behalf of the Ubuntu Leadership team, I’m doing a call for the team leaders of the various teams that make Ubuntu and its flavours possible.  The reason for this call is simple- (as a team) to find what problems in that teams’ leadership and what works.  In turn, these problems can be talked about in order for a solution to be found and that solution can be then shared via the Ubuntu Leadership wiki for other folks to read.

What teams are needed:

  • Ubuntu and the flvours developer, translation, marketing, and the other teams that are key to the success
  • LoCo Leaders/Point of Contacts
  • Ubuntu Women Elected Leaders
  • And other team leaders can of course join in!

How to join:

It’s your choice if you want to join the Ubuntu Leadership team on LaunchPad, it’s the the mailing-list that is important!  What you need to put in for your message is: who you are, what team that you are a leader to, what problems in leadership that you are facing or what is working for you, and what sort of questions/comments do you have about the problem that you are facing.  For the subject, your standard new member introduction or maybe say “Leader from [insert team name here]“.

Extra Links:

Ubuntu Leadership mailing-list idea on this


Categories: Planet Ohio

Plymouth Bootsplashes

Paul Tagliamonte's Blog - Sun, 07/20/2014 - 16:02

Why oh why are they so hard to write?

Even using the built in modules it is insanely hard to debug. Playing a bootsplash in X sucks and my machine boots too fast to test it on reboot.

Basically, euch. All I wanted was a hackers zebra on boot :(

Categories: Planet Ohio

New GnuPG key

Stephen's Blog - Sat, 05/17/2014 - 19:00
9C4B2D87 is the new small-c canonical GnuPG key for me.
Categories: Planet Ohio